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Ag Today Thursday, February 18, 2016

Ag Today Thursday, February 18, 2016   Opinion Los Angeles Times Treat wildfires like other natural disasters By Dianne Feinstein and Ken Pimlott More than 10 million acres of forest burned in 2015, the worst year for U.S. wildfires ever recorded. With incredibly dry conditions across the American West, fire lines were intensely hot and flames spread faster, producing some of the most dangerous conditions firefighters have ever seen. In the face of climate change and drought, longer and more severe fire seasons are to be expected. But last year the United States also suffered more catastrophic fires. These fires are natural disasters, as destructive as many hurricanes,...

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Ag Today Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Ag Today Wednesday, February 17, 2016   Redding Record Searchlight Salmon concerns may affect water deliveries By Damon Arthur Unlike the past two years, some North State water agencies have received a glimmer of hope they won't see water cuts this year from the federal government. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation has notified senior water rights holders — such as the city of Redding and the Anderson-Cottonwood Irrigation District — the amount of water flowing into Lake Shasta this winter has been high enough to forestall the 25 percent water delivery cuts they have seen the past two years. But concerns the winter-run chinook salmon is at the...

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Ag Today Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Ag Today Tuesday, February 16, 2016   Editorial Los Angeles Times Feinstein water bill could help with California's drought—if House GOP gives it a chance As an attempt to balance many competing interests, the water bill that California Democrat Dianne Feinstein introduced in the Senate last week appears well-thought-through and carefully crafted — and as such it is being greeted by many with the kind of lukewarm response that such attempts often receive. Few seem ready to embrace it without reservation, precisely because it offers a compromise. If it were the product of negotiations among environmental stewards, agribusiness and urban water agencies, it would leave...

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February Newspaper Vol. 6 No.2

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Ag Today Friday, February 12, 2016

Ag Today Friday, February 12, 2016   Fresno Bee Kings County opponents of high-speed rail get their court date By Tim Sheehan SACRAMENTO - Attorneys for and against California’s high-speed rail project made their final arguments Thursday to a Sacramento County Superior Court judge who will decide whether the proposed bullet-train system complies with the requirements set out in 2008 by Proposition 1A. It’s taken more than four years for the lawsuit, filed in late 2011 by Kings County farmer John Tos, Hanford homeowner Aaron Fukuda and the Kings County Board of Supervisors against the California High-Speed Rail Authority, to reach Thursday’s trial. And both sides are...

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Ag Today Thursday, February 11, 2016

Ag Today Thursday, February 11, 2016   San Francisco Chronicle Feinstein water plan could permit more pumping for farmers By Carolyn Lochhead WASHINGTON — Amid record-high farm revenue and record-low salmon counts in California’s historic drought, Sen. Dianne Feinstein introduced legislation Wednesday that would make it easier to move more water from rivers to farms in the San Joaquin Valley. The long-awaited 184-page bill follows the California Democrat’s failed negotiations last year with the powerful House Republicans who represent valley farming interests, and several years of failure by the state’s congressional delegation to shape a federal response to the four-year drought. In a nine-page press release, Feinstein said...

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Ag Today Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Ag Today Wednesday, February 10, 2016   Associated Press California farmers reap record sales in record drought Ellen Knickmeyer and Scott Smith FRESNO — A new state report shows California farmers reaping record sales despite the epic drought, thriving even as city-dwellers have been forced to conserve water, household wells have run dry and fish have died. California's 76,400 farms recorded $53.5 billion in sales in 2014, the year Gov. Jerry Brown declared the state in a drought emergency and launched what in 2015 became mandatory conservation for cities and towns. The sales figures are the most recent annual ones released by the state agriculture department. With the...

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Ag Today Monday, February 8, 2016

Ag Today Monday, February 8, 2016   Marysville Appeal-Democrat Rural water providers lose out over fee claim By Harold Kruger A Sacramento judge this week turned aside the protests of rural water providers who claimed the state won't reimburse them for water conservation activities that could cost millions of dollars. The entities, including the Glenn-Colusa Irrigation District, sued last year, alleging the Commission on State Mandates had denied their test claims. Under changes to the Water Code, agricultural water suppliers that serve more than 25,000 irrigated acres have to measure the volume of water delivered to each farm gate and adopt a pricing structure based on the quantity...

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Ag Today Friday, February 5, 2016

Ag Today Friday, February 5, 2016   Los Angeles Times Why your Super Bowl vegetable platter might cost more this year By Geoffrey Mohan Produce seller Rich Uchida is sitting pretty for the Super Bowl right about now. Because it turns out California not only has the 50th edition of the game, it has the Buffalo wings and veggie platters cornered, too. Uchida's employer, Duda Farm Fresh Foods, is the king of celery sticks, and isn't into cauliflower much. In an industry where timing is everything, both of those positions are important, because it's been a wild season in the winter produce market dominated by California growers, who...

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Ag Today Thursday, February 4, 2016

Ag Today Thursday, February 4, 2016   Visalia Times-Delta HLB found among Southern California trees, insects By David Castellon For nearly eight years, California’s citrus industry has lived in fear of Asian citrus psyllids infected with the huanglongbing bacteria migrating across the southern part of the state and heading north, where they could infect commercial citrus trees and devastate the state’s citrus industry. Some of those worst fears are being realized as word is spreading that a group of psyllids found to be infected with the bacteria — also known as “HLB” — have been found since the middle of last year in the Southern California community...

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