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Ag Today Monday, February 1, 2016

Ag Today Monday, February 1, 2016   Sacramento Bee California almonds, partly blamed for water shortage, now dropping in price By Dale Kasler, Phillip Reese and Ryan Sabalow They were blamed for planting too many trees, using too much water and worsening the effects of California’s epic drought. The state’s almond farmers responded by expanding their orchards in a bold wager that the sky-high prices the world was paying for almonds justified both the water use and long-term investment. Now those farmers are dealing with a steep drop in prices – and wondering if the great almond boom that transformed Central Valley agriculture is starting to fizzle. Almond...

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Ag Today Friday, January 29, 2016

Ag Today Friday, January 29, 2016   Associated Press State starts decisive year on governor’s water tunnels By Ellen Knickmeyer SAN FRANCISCO - State regulators launched Thursday into a year of pivotal decisions on Gov. Jerry Brown’s quest to build two giant tunnels to ferry water from Northern California for Central and Southern California, a $17-billion project that would be one of the largest in decades in the state. Brown’s administration and the water agencies that are slated — but not yet formally committed — to pay for the two, 35-mile-long tunnels from the delta of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers are the project’s biggest supporters,...

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Ag Today Thursday, January 28, 2016

Ag Today Thursday, January 28, 2016   Ventura County Star Groups urge officials to strengthen labor protections for farmworkers By Claudia Boyd-Barrett Farmworker advocates are calling on the Ventura County and Santa Barbara County Boards of Supervisors to enact a "Farmworker Bill of Rights" to protect laborers against alleged abuses. At a launch event at the Ventura County Government Center on Wednesday, groups who work with farmworkers denounced what they say are widespread labor-rights violations in agricultural fields along the Central Coast. A Farmworker Bill of Rights would help prevent such violations, organizers said. Their proposal calls for a series of policies designed to strengthen protections against extreme...

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MCFB continuing legal battle over Gunner Ranch West project

MCFB continuing legal battle over Gunner Ranch West project                                                                 Published on 01/27/2016 - 10:47 am                                                                Written by Business Journal StaffThe Madera County Farm Bureau has filed additional litigation challenging the Madera County Board of Supervisors’ approval of the Gunner Ranch West Specific Plan Project. Last week, the Madera County Farm Bureau (MCFB) filed a Reply Brief in its lawsuit opposing the controversial project. According to Christina Beckstead, MCFB executive director, the nonprofit organization brought the lawsuit because of “grave concerns regarding a development project that threatens scarce groundwater.” Madera County supervisors approved the Gunner Ranch West project in July 2014. The project’s backer, area...

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Ag Today Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Ag Today Wednesday, January 27, 2016   Los Angeles Times California's snowpack is deepest in five years after recent storms By Veronica Rocha California’s current snowpack is the deepest it has been in five years -- a modest, yet encouraging milestone in a period of prolonged drought. Readings of the Sierra Nevada snowpack on Tuesday showed water content statewide was 18.7 inches, or 115% of the historical average for that date, according to the California Department of Water Resources. Water officials say the good news is that California’s snowpack and reservoirs have benefited from El Niño rainstorms. But they warned that it was too soon to determine whether...

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Ag Today Tuesday, January 26, 2016

Ag Today Tuesday, January 26, 2016   Marysville Appeal-Democrat Drought Watch: Optimism at area reservoirs By Chris Kaufman Water, water, everywhere. Local officials are optimistic that if weather trends continue, the prospect is promising reservoirs will be at a sustainable levels. "Were doing great," said Lincoln Young, Collins Lake's general manager, who said the Yuba County spot is 30 feet from full — up from 68 feet from full in October. "To be at that stage this week in January is comforting," said Young, who has managed the lake's recreation portion for more than 40 years. "We need to see normal rainfall activity from here on out to be...

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Ag Today Monday, January 25, 2016

Ag Today Monday, January 25, 2016   Sacramento Bee Feds to California farmers: Water reserves low despite recent rains By Ryan Sabalow and Dale Kasler Even as steady rains drenched the Sacramento Valley on Friday, federal dam managers issued a bleak proclamation to farmers hopeful that recent rain and snow might translate into more water deliveries for their crops. On Friday, the Bureau of Reclamation issued notice that reservoir levels behind Central Valley Project dams remained unusually low despite recent rains and heavy snowpack. The notice is likely to portend another rough year for the thousands of Sacramento and San Joaquin Valley farmers whose water districts contract with...

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Ag Today Friday, January 22, 2016

Ag Today Friday, January 22, 2016   Redding Record Searchlight Siskiyou County residents express worry over wolves By Damon Arthur YREKA — Some 300 people showed up at a hearing in Yreka on Thursday night to comment on the state’s draft Gray Wolf Conservation Plan. Most of those who spoke represented ranching and hunting groups from Siskiyou County who were concerned about the wolves’ return to California. “I don’t want a wolf kill on my place,” said Ryan Walker, a Siskiyou County rancher, referring to wolves killing cattle. “I need to know where the wolves are.” The conservation plan attempts to manage the growing number of wolves that have...

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Ag Today Thursday, January 21, 2016

Ag Today Thursday, January 21, 2016   Orange County Register Immigration tops politically charged caseload for the Supreme Court By Mark Sherman WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court’s decision to add immigration to its already robust list of politically charged cases means a raft of rulings in the late spring or early summer that could inject the court into the presidential campaign. Cases involving abortion, affirmative action, labor unions and the Obama health care law have already given the high court’s term a campaign-season flavor. A ruling on President Barack Obama’s authority to shield up to 5 million immigrants who are living in the United States illegally from deportation...

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January Newspaper Vol.6 No. 1

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