Ag Today

AG Today

Updated Daily

Ag Today Monday, March 16, 2015

Ready to fight: Some growers unwilling to lose land for bullet train [Los Angeles Times] …When the state chose to start construction of the high-speed rail in the Central Valley, it was based partly on the theory that assembling needed land would be easiest in the state's rural backbone. As it turns out, some of the farmers most resistant to accepting state offers are proving to be wealthy, highly educated professionals and investors — and formidable opponents in negotiations. Whether the issues they are raising are valid or intended to drive up prices, their ability to hold out against early...

Read More

Ag Today Monday, March 16, 2015

Ready to fight: Some growers unwilling to lose land for bullet train [Los Angeles Times] …When the state chose to start construction of the high-speed rail in the Central Valley, it was based partly on the theory that assembling needed land would be easiest in the state's rural backbone. As it turns out, some of the farmers most resistant to accepting state offers are proving to be wealthy, highly educated professionals and investors — and formidable opponents in negotiations. Whether the issues they are raising are valid or intended to drive up prices, their ability to hold out against early...

Read More

Ag Today Monday, March 16, 2015

Ready to fight: Some growers unwilling to lose land for bullet train [Los Angeles Times] …When the state chose to start construction of the high-speed rail in the Central Valley, it was based partly on the theory that assembling needed land would be easiest in the state's rural backbone. As it turns out, some of the farmers most resistant to accepting state offers are proving to be wealthy, highly educated professionals and investors — and formidable opponents in negotiations. Whether the issues they are raising are valid or intended to drive up prices, their ability to hold out against early...

Read More

Ag Today Monday, March 16, 2015

Ready to fight: Some growers unwilling to lose land for bullet train [Los Angeles Times] …When the state chose to start construction of the high-speed rail in the Central Valley, it was based partly on the theory that assembling needed land would be easiest in the state's rural backbone. As it turns out, some of the farmers most resistant to accepting state offers are proving to be wealthy, highly educated professionals and investors — and formidable opponents in negotiations. Whether the issues they are raising are valid or intended to drive up prices, their ability to hold out against early...

Read More

Ag Today Monday, March 16, 2015

Ready to fight: Some growers unwilling to lose land for bullet train [Los Angeles Times] …When the state chose to start construction of the high-speed rail in the Central Valley, it was based partly on the theory that assembling needed land would be easiest in the state's rural backbone. As it turns out, some of the farmers most resistant to accepting state offers are proving to be wealthy, highly educated professionals and investors — and formidable opponents in negotiations. Whether the issues they are raising are valid or intended to drive up prices, their ability to hold out against early...

Read More

Ag Today Monday, March 16, 2015

Ready to fight: Some growers unwilling to lose land for bullet train [Los Angeles Times] …When the state chose to start construction of the high-speed rail in the Central Valley, it was based partly on the theory that assembling needed land would be easiest in the state's rural backbone. As it turns out, some of the farmers most resistant to accepting state offers are proving to be wealthy, highly educated professionals and investors — and formidable opponents in negotiations. Whether the issues they are raising are valid or intended to drive up prices, their ability to hold out against early...

Read More

Ag Today Monday, March 16, 2015

Ready to fight: Some growers unwilling to lose land for bullet train [Los Angeles Times] …When the state chose to start construction of the high-speed rail in the Central Valley, it was based partly on the theory that assembling needed land would be easiest in the state's rural backbone. As it turns out, some of the farmers most resistant to accepting state offers are proving to be wealthy, highly educated professionals and investors — and formidable opponents in negotiations. Whether the issues they are raising are valid or intended to drive up prices, their ability to hold out against early...

Read More

Ag Today Tuesday, February 17, 2015

An encore of Valley drought crisis — only worse [Fresno Bee] The next train wreck in California’s drought is headed for the San Joaquin Valley this week when federal leaders forecast how much river water farmers can expect to irrigate nearly 3 million acres this summer. Most folks in farm country are expecting the same number as last year — zero for both east and west sides of the Valley. Consecutive years of no river water would be another unprecedented body punch from a drought dating back to the winter of 2011-12….This week, the angst will come from the...

Read More

Ag Today Tuesday, February 17, 2015

An encore of Valley drought crisis — only worse [Fresno Bee] The next train wreck in California’s drought is headed for the San Joaquin Valley this week when federal leaders forecast how much river water farmers can expect to irrigate nearly 3 million acres this summer. Most folks in farm country are expecting the same number as last year — zero for both east and west sides of the Valley. Consecutive years of no river water would be another unprecedented body punch from a drought dating back to the winter of 2011-12….This week, the angst will come from the...

Read More

Ag Today Tuesday, February 17, 2015

An encore of Valley drought crisis — only worse [Fresno Bee] The next train wreck in California’s drought is headed for the San Joaquin Valley this week when federal leaders forecast how much river water farmers can expect to irrigate nearly 3 million acres this summer. Most folks in farm country are expecting the same number as last year — zero for both east and west sides of the Valley. Consecutive years of no river water would be another unprecedented body punch from a drought dating back to the winter of 2011-12….This week, the angst will come from the...

Read More